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500 X 26 - Brick Building

 
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shadowlight
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 3:23 am    Post subject: 500 X 26 - Brick Building Reply with quote


I know I'm a little late. I'm still trying to get back on schedule here. Wink I'll look for some more prompts when I get more time. I look forward to seeing what you do with this.

Below is the image in its original context on the page: www.freeimage4u.com/ All_BWConstructions.htm
All the material on this site has no copyright claim and may be used freely.

Have fun--
shadowlight

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Harry
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So Many Children

Harry Buschman


The agent stopped the car and cranked Mrs. Goose’s window down. “I’m sure you’ll be happy here, Mrs. Goose. There are fourteen bedrooms on the second floor, and the downstairs dining room is big enough for a table holding twenty people.”

It sounded good to Mrs. Goose, she had so many children she didn’t know what to do and the shoe they lived in was getting tighter by the minute. And those kids! All of them working and not one of them earning enough to get a place of their own. Twelve girls and not one of them with a steady boy friend. She told the rental agent ... “I got twelve dryers goin’ twenny fours a day – you know how girls are. They can’t wear somethin’ tonight they wore today ... and the line-up for the john! You wouldn’t believe.”

“This place has a ‘ladies’ and a ‘gents’ – four holers. Used to be a church you know?”

“How can it used to be a church? Once a church always a church.”

“They had a problem, Ma’am. Latter Day Saints I believe ... you know, bigamy and all that. The whole congregation headed west I believe.” He saw the worried look in Mrs. Goose’s eyes and quickly reassured her ... “But the building is in prime condition, I’m sure you and Mr. Goose will be happy here.”

“There ain’t no Mr. Goose,” she said shortly. “Bigamy, huh? Bigamy’s a problem in the barnyard too.” It sure sounded good to Mrs. Goose, her squabbling brood of goslings had worn her to a frazzle. The idea of setting up housekeeping in a church with an upstairs and a downstairs sounded good – maybe the place would look real cute if she hung some tie-back curtains over those windows.
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shadowlight
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:28 pm    Post subject: Squatter's Rights (WC 500) Reply with quote

Squatter’s Rights
© Marlicia Fernandez (WC 500) ( 7-13 –06)


Shouts from across the yard shattered the peaceful morning. A truck rumbled over the dirt lane.

“Mr. Kreggs, you know why we’re here; be a good man and come on out.

Archibald C. Kreggs swung his legs over the bed and reached for his robe. He put it on as his feet found slipped into well-worn slippers. He padded across rough wooden floors and drawing aside one curtain, looked out the window. They were back, despite letters written and papers filed. This time a man with a megaphone stood beside a car with the word ‘Constable’ painted on the side. A truck holding half a dozen men sat in the road, just left of his garden. Further down the long drive, at the gate, a bulldozer and dump truck waited. He let the drape fall.

A short walk brought Archibald to the kitchen where he placed bread in the toaster and put a kettle to boil while he popped breakfast in the microwave. He grimaced. Food didn’t taste the same since Mrs. Kreggs died.

Over the drone of voices in the yard, an annoying electronic beeping told him his scrambled eggs were ready. He took them from the oven and slid them onto a plate. Then he retrieved his toast. Archibald C. Kreggs was a creature of habit and he always began with his toast, dry, no butter no jam.

Unwelcome words, so far successfully ignored, destroyed his enjoyment of his breakfast.

“Be reasonable Mr. Kreggs. It will save us all a lot of trouble.”

“I have been reasonable,” he grumbled. They didn’t want reasonable, they wanted … what was the word? Capitulation. The man outside wanted his capitulation.

He moved to the window and opened it. “I’m not leaving my home.”

“You’re not Archibald Kreggs.”

Megaphone man didn’t seem surprised, more like he’d had his suspicions confirmed. Archibald’s mind ran through everything he’d done the last three years, trips made, papers signed. Of the papers there were a few, including his refusal to leave his home. Of the trips there were none, his food and necessaries were delivered, paid electronically. “You’re nuts.”

The constable lowered the megaphone and started toward the door. “You never come out any more.”

“A man can change.” He reached for the gun hidden beneath the sink.

“Maybe, but I’m thinking no.” The constable dropped the bombshell. “Your fingerprints don’t match.”

That’s what he’d missed, fingerprints on the note. “Ok, you got me. Mr. Kreggs moved out.”

The constable waved everyone forward. Someone got on a radio and the vehicles at the end of the drive started toward the house. “You’ll have to leave.”

“It is my house.”

The constable’s hand fell to his sidearm. “By what right?”

He readied his own weapon. “By squatter’s rights.” He remembered the bodies beneath the bedroom floor; the bodies of Mr. & Mrs. Archibald C. Kreggs. He’d made a new life for himself here, a clean life. Their discovery would destroy that. That couldn’t be allowed to happen.

[end]

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Last edited by shadowlight on Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
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shadowlight
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry,

I love this extension of Mother Goose. What a wonderful concept. Smile

Fourteen bedrooms upstairs? The place is bigger than it looks. Wink I loved the whole mood of this little snippet. The humor is infectious and I enjoyed it very much. Thank you for posting it.

marlicia

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Harry
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The gloves are off the housing market and it's everybody for themselves. How long did Mr. Whats-his-name get away with it? Nice twisty little story, Marlicia, and a glimpse into your non fantasy world. This was a real tough prompt, by the way.
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shadowlight
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on this for me, Harry. You konw I appreciate it. Whats-his-name lived in the house about three years, but I'm not sure when (or why) he killed the owners and took over the man's identity. Nice way to start a clean life, huh?

I guess it was a tough prompt...just a brick building... You did well with it, however. Wink

I'm glad you liked this.

marlicia

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Heidi
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 10:43 am    Post subject: prompt Reply with quote

The Church

The man walked slowly towards the back of the church near the graveyard. He sighed heavily letting his silver hair get blown by the wind, his wrinkled face wore an expression of sadness. He stooped down by a grave a few feet from the back door. It read, here lies Mary Ann Kinkle loving wife and mother. 1984-2000. "Hey Gary still musing over the past are we?" John asked as he came up behind the old pastor.
"Hey John." Gary replied a small smile spreading across his lips. The young man with light brown hair and green eyes smiled back at him. "Come on you have to get ready for the service you know."
"Yes, I suppose you're right." Gary said standing up slowly. He glanced back at his wife's grave then followed John inside. He breathed deeply as he entered the brown church filled with elegant stained-glass windows and oak pews. "So what are you going to talk about today?" John asked as he sat down in the front row, it was neary ten the service would start soon. Gary winked at John, "That will have to be a surprise." he said with a laugh. John just shook his head and laughed as he watched the old pastor greet his flock as they came in the door for yet another church service.
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Harry
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Enigmatic, Heidi. Who was Mary Ann Kinkle – a wife and a mother at the age of 16? A tragedy with a surprise sermon at the ten o'clock service. You interest me Heidi – what's in your mind?
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shadowlight
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2006 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice job, Heidi. A rather sad piece, but with an undercurrent of quiet strength. I, too, wonder who she was. Was she actually the old pastor's wife, or was he looking past her grave to her mothers? Interesting. Smile

It's nice to see you posting again.

shadowlight

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Paul Grimsley
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They called him a foundling but he knew he had been left, not found. This place was where he had been deposited, an unsigned for parcel. But how little origins mattered for him and all those who came here after him. Origins were for Darwin and the Bible -- he was all for the future.
They called this place The Building Block, that was how it was known to all around here -- to everyone in fact; for it had a good and widespread reputation.
If you were abandoned, left alone, perhaps even washed-up, this place would be the place to turn you around and set you straight on your way. Thomas was proud of that. It had been instilled in him early on that what he did determined who he was, not where he came from. He treated everyone like that -- if you were broken that suggested you could be fixed.
This place had mended him. He had been a difficult child and now he was a bastion of the community. But the proudest achievement of his life was that three of the rooms in this building were occupied by his children. They were good children: respectful, bright, and all of them good natured. He had worked hard so that they could avoid as much of the harshness of life as possible. Not easy considering the function of this building, but he had done it.
Sat in shadow as the sun moved towards the midday apex he thought that this building, which would stand long after he was in the ground, would be a testament to him, and that was enough. He smiled: yes, that was enough.
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